Santa Fe Feb 16-19, 2012

We invite you to join us for our exciting, stimulating, life-affirming conference in Santa Fe February 16-19, 2012. Our meeting will be held at La Fonda  on the Plaza, one of Santa Fe’s finest hotels. The presentations will probe into the relationships between the artists’ psychodynamics and the Art they create. Santa Fe is vibrant with FineRestaurants, Museums and the colorful Plaza across the street from our hotel.

Thursday Feb. 16, 2012  Coffee will be available for registrants each day prior to the presentations. Welcome: Jacqueline Berz Panter, MA, MS.

8:30AM  Personality, Politics & Paranoia: The 5 ‘Flights’ of Michelangelo Thomas K. Nelson, MD
 9:30         Personality Integration: Mining the Soul’s Creative Base Diane Light, CIT, LCS
10:45       Nureyev & Fonteyn: A Psychological Study of Romance Godfrey Ripley, MD
11:45       Creative Women And The Word: How Journaling Helps Keep Us Sane
                                      Rosemary Daniell & Connie Baechler, PhD

4-6    Discussion Group: Thursday, Friday and Saturday

Friday – the 17th

8:30          Cultivating Creativity for Clients… and Clinicians  David Bookbinder, LMHC
9:30          Edward Hopper’s Paintings and Severe Failed Mutuality. Michael Sperber, MD
10:45        The Muse’s Call  Kathryn Ridall, PhD
11:45         The Possessor And The Possessed: A Psychological Study of Mozart & Mania
                       Roy Rogosin, MA & Shahna Rogosin, MD

Saturday – the 18th
8:30      A Dry Place To Call Their Home: The Death of Kurt Cobain  Mike Alvarez, MA
9:30      Love, Work and Dreams in the Establishment of Integrity  Robert Hyman, MFT
10:45    Glory Days—Springsteen’s Impact on Popular Culture.  Richard Grosse, LCSW
11:45     Crooked Beauty and the Intertwined Threads of Madness, Creativity and Wellness
             Ken Rosenthal, Filmmaker & Barry Panter, MD

Sunday – the 19th
8:30   Obata’s Art; The Sierra to Internment: Nature, Creativity & Healing David Lo, MD
9:30   Soul of Person: The Philosophy of George Nakashima” B. Olshin, PhD
10:45    Brooke Astor, Anette De la Renta and ELDER ABUSE     Salila Sharma MD, FACP &
The Honorable Ms. Karen Pacheco, District Attorney, Santa Fe,NM

11:45    #iCareBecauseYouDo: Social Media, Technology, and the Helping Professional”
                      Bernice Imei Hsu, RN,LMHC

Optional Workshops (additional Continuing Education):  Each 3 hour workshop is $50

Thursday 2-5      Creative Writing for Sanity  Rosemary Daniell & Connie Baechler, PhD
Friday 2-5           Cultivating Creativity              David Bookbinder, LMHC
Saturday 2-5      Healing the Self Through Self Portraits    Amy Stein, MFA, ACP, MHP

 Accreditation: The American Institute of Medical Education is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. AIMED designates this live activity for a maximum of 22 AMA PRA Category 1 credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of  their participation in the activity.
AIMED also is approved for Social Workers, MFT’s, Counselors, RN’s & others. Please call if you need more information. An additional 9 Hours are available by attending the workshops.
APA: The program is co-sponsored by The American Institute of Medical Education and Wisdom Wave of Santa Fe. Wisdom Wave is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Wisdom Wave maintains responsibility for this program and its content..
 Accommodations: We have arranged for rates of $145+tax (double) $135+ tax (single) at La Fonda Hotel  (www.lafondasantafe.com) The hotel is on The historic Plaza. There is entertainment in the lobby, a health spa, a lovely restaurant and other features of one of Santa Fe’s finest hotels. Please contact us to reserve at the group rate: (800) 348-8441, , www.Creativityandmadness.com. Less expensive accommodations are available nearby:

The Sage Inn $53 per night + tax Please call this hotel directly  505) 982-5952
More hotels will be posted later. (800) 348 8441 for more information.

Registration Fee for 22 Hours of CE is $525 (accompanying registrant $445)

To Register:

(800) 348-8441;
Fax (323) 874-5503
email

Travel Information, low airfares and car rentals please call The Travel Station (800) 990-2282. Room Reservations Please contact us (800) 348-8441, or Creativityandmadness.com.
Deposit $250  Full Payment is due January 13th
Cancellation Policy $100 prior to January 13th. $100 plus one night’s room charge from January 14th.

 

The American Institute of Medical Education

WINTER CONFERENCE – Needs and Objectives and Disclosure Statement

LA FONDA HOTEL – SANTA FE, NM

February 16 – 19, 2012
COMMERCIAL DISCLOSURE INFORMATION

 

The American Institute of Medical Education wishes to advise all participants in this conference that unless you are advised at the time of a particular presentation, none of the faculty members has a relevant financial relationship/interest/arrangement or affiliation with any corporate organization or commercial interest that has offered financial support for their presentation. Signed faculty disclosure forms are on file in the AIMED corporate office. Further, our faculty is aware of the responsibility to inform participants of off-label uses if discussed during any presentation. The American Institute of Medical Education does not accept commercial support for any of its programs and does not have financial relationships with any commercial interest. Disclosure forms are on file from all in control of this program’s content.

NEEDS, OBJECTIVES and OUTLINES

 

Thursday, February 16

8:30 am

TITLE:                        Personality, Politics and Paranoia: The Five “Flights” of Michelangelo

NEEDS:                      All people employ defense mechanisms.  Whether or not a given defense is

adaptive or maladaptive can depend upon a variety of factors, including the environment faced by a given individual.  There is evidence that Michelangelo employed the ego defense mechanism of projection at various times in his life and manifested paranoid personality traits.  Such tendencies were most overtly on display during his five ‘flights’ – times when he abruptly ran away under the pretext of threats real or imagined.  Each of these flights will be evaluated from the perspective of paranoid personality formation.  It will be seen that, given the complexity of Renaissance historical circumstances, not all of his flights were pathological, revealing the need for clinical circumspection when diagnosing personality disorders.

OBJECTIVES:           By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Describe projection as an ego defense mechanism
  • Explain diagnostic criteria for Paranoid Personality Disorder
  • Appreciate the complexity of evaluating paranoid traits
  • Understand how to interact therapeutically with the paranoid patient

SPEAKER:                 Thomas Nelson, M.D.

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by Power Point presentation

EVALUATION:          Standard evaluation form

OUTLINE:

  1. 1494 – Flight #1.  Fear
  2. 1506 – Flight #2.  Rage
    1. Threat vs. projection?  Sibling rivalry?
    2. Paranoid Personality

i.     Projection

ii.     Diagnostic criteria exemplified

iii.     Therapeutic approach

  1. 1529 – Flight #3.  Warning
  2. 1534 – Flight #4.  Prudence
  3. 1556 – Flight #5.  Wisdom

9:30 am

TITLE:                        Personality Integration: Mining the Soul’s Creative Base

NEEDS:                      Many people seeking psychotherapy for relief of various life

difficulties and overt symptoms are also suffering from

suppressed creativity and are unconsciously yearning for the

authentic self. As a result, their relationships are in distress and

their work lives can be full of strife. There are those too, who

are very actively creative but lack the mental discipline to

organize their creative life in any meaningful way. By learning

the components of Personality Integration Theory and Therapy,

and by understanding the central role  and the powerful force of

creative interests and creative expression in the overall balance

of the human personality, the mental health practitioner will be

aided in the planning of treatment and treatment strategies for

the individual in therapy.

OBJECTIVES:            At the conclusion of the presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe Personality Integration Theory and its drive theory.
  • Explain how the parts in the psyche can function to inhibit or to encourage creative expression.
  • List 2 elements of the central importance of creative expression for the mental health of the individual.
  • Explain specific functional methods that can be applied by individuals in treatment for creative recovery and healing.

SPEAKER:                 Diane Light, MA, CIT, LCS

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation with Q & A

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. Context
  • Creativity in the context of evolution
  • The new paradigm for mental health
  1. Theory
  • Definitions
  • Diagrams
  • Components
  • Examples from public life (movies, politics, etc.)
  1. Psychotherapy
  2. Application/Clinical Vignettes
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatment
  • Outcomes

V.        Summary and Conclusions

 

 

10:45 am

TITLE:                                    Nureyev & Fonteyn: A Psychological Study of Romance

NEEDS:                      Theirs was a love affair celebrated not only on the ballet stage, but in their

private life as well.  Passion, pathos and politics blended with more than a hint of Greek mythology and Freudian complexes.  The beauty of their artistry took them beyond the world of ballet and into the public domain.  Healthcare providers need to recognize the relationship between the patient’s presentation and his/her social milleu as well as the presence of metaphor.

OBJECTIVES:            At the conclusion of the presentation, participant will be able to:

  • Describe the concerns of those patients who have been exposed to socio-political trauma.
  • Explain the place of metaphor in the acting out of the patient’s pathology.
  • Explain the unique physiology and medical issues of the athlete.

SPEAKER:                 Godfrey Ripley, M.D

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation with Q & A

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

ABSTRACT:               This presentation will explore the atavistic and existential dynamic forces

which brought  together this magnificent pair and enthralled the public in the 1960s   It will also review the unique physiology, psychology  – and medical issues – of the ballet dancer, a professional athlete.

 

11:45 am

TITLE:                        Creative Women and the Word: How Journaling Helps Keep Us Sane

NEEDS:                      Many women (and men) are resistant to journal keeping. Some feel this way

because they “don’t want to go there,” that is, give dark feelings reality by putting them down on the page This is true even for women writers and others working in creative fields who often feel that their efforts should be confined to and focused on their public works of art. Others, in contrast, have made journal keeping the center of their lives. In this presentation, we will discuss the journals of such women writers and artists as Anais Nin, Frida Kahlo, novelist Gail Godwin and myself; we will discuss how these artists’ various and unique methods of journal- keeping fueled their creativity, led to personal growth, and helped heal wounds that might otherwise have become incapacitating. We may touch briefly on the recently published journals of monologist Spalding Gray, whose suicide, as the book illustrates, was not because of his journal keeping, but despite it. We will also refer to Brenda Stockdale’s book You Can Beat the Odds (Sentient Publications, 2009) with its focus on research demonstrating the power of “naming and linking” and the truth of the credo, “Write through pain to peace.”

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this Presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List 3 modes and methods of journaling
  • List 4 benefits of journal keeping not only for artists but for anyone in search of healing and personal growth.
  • List 3 examples that support this thesis.

SPEAKERS:               Rosemary Daniell and Connie Baechler, Ph.D.

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

 

OUTLINE:

  1. Connie Baechler discusses her Ph.D. dissertation, Voyages and Voyeurs: A Language of the Interior in the Journals of Anais Nin and Rosemary Daniell
  2. Rosemary Daniell discusses the methods she has used during over 45 years of journal keeping, and how this has affected her art and life.
  3. Connie Baechler and Rosemary Daniell discuss the methods and effects of journal keeping in the lives of other women artists.
  4. Present and discuss how journaling can be helpful for patients in clinical practice.
  5. Concluding remarks of the benefits and challenges of journaling in the lives of both artists and others.

 

 

2:00– 5:00 pm        OPTIONAL WORKSHOP

TITLE:                        Creative Writing for Sanity   

ABSTRACT:               A Zona Rosa workshop for beginning and experienced writers and journal keepers

where participants will benefit from short writing “exorcises,” which will offer an immediate opportunity to express one’s truths in the spontaneous manner, characteristic of the best personal writing. Participants will learn about various journaling methods as additional techniques to exploring one’s inner life, discover major emotional and psychological issues, thereby being able to get to an deeper understanding of one’s inner life. This will enable the clinician to work in a more effective manner with clients in practice. These are techniques used by creative people in order to gestate their ideas, stay sane during the creative process, and lead vertical (in depth) rather than horizontal (shallow) lives; we will also discuss the importance and benefits of recording our dreams as a part of our journal keeping. And, most importantly, participants will learn methods for facilitating their clients and themselves in using this invaluable tool for healing.

FACILITATORS:       Rosemary Daniell, author m and Connie Baechler, Ph.D.

FORMAT:                  3-Hour Experiential Workshop – Didactic and Personal Interaction

 

 

4:00 – 6:00 pm

TITLE:                        Afternoon Discussion Group

NEEDS:                      These interactive discussion groups will give the participants an opportunity to share and discuss on a deeper and more detailed level the important psychosocial lessons taught in the morning lectures and so help them remove obstacles they might face in treating their patients. The Discussion Groups will be used to actively involve the participants in handling the concepts and principles presented, and to allow for greater elaboration and refinement of points made earlier

GROUP LEADER:     Members of the morning faculty

FORMAT:                  Interactive Group Discussions

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

 

 

 

Friday, February 17

 

8:30am

TITLE:                        Cultivating Creativity for Clients and Clinicians

NEEDS:                      Many psychotherapy clients reach points in therapy where they appear to be “stuck,” and clinicians often feel “stuck,” too. Other clients report feeling like their therapist is going “by the book” and that therapy feels stale and unhelpful. This “stuckness” and “staleness” is often thought of as “resistance” by the therapist, but sometimes it is due to failure to think outside an established pattern. It frequently leads to frustration and poor outcomes for client and clinician alike. This lecture gives an overview of creative tools and techniques that are helpful for “unsticking” clients, and presents imagination-based strategies for helping clinicians expand the creativity, flexibility, and effectiveness of their clinical practices.

OBJECTIVES:            By the end of this lecture, participants will be able to:

  • Explain and use the “Miracle Question” to envision an “ideal” creative and effective clinical practice
  • Identify “experiments” they can conduct in their own practices to move from their current practice to this ideal practice
  • Describe a variety of creative tools they can incorporate into their work with clients

SPEAKER:                 David Bookbinder, LMHC – www.davidbookbinder.com

FORMAT:                  Didactic presentation enhanced by PowerPoint

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

I. Lecture overview

II.       Re-visioning your practice:

–       Introduction to using the Miracle Question to envision your ideal practice

–       Introduction to using scaling to gauge progress toward the ideal practice

–       Identify experiments you can conduct to move further toward the ideal practice

–       Learn the iterative process of conducting experiments, re-scaling yourself after the experiment is done, and creating new experiments to keep you moving toward the ideal practice

  1. Tools for cultivating creative work with clients:

–       Introduction to using the Miracle Question to help clients envision their preferred selves and lives

–       Overview of the following creative tools and techniques: Writing with Two Hands technique, Circles of Problems and Resources tool, Spell Map tool, Bubble-map brainstorming for clinical goals, Gestalt psychodrama and metaphor techniques for ambivalence and dream work

–       Brainstorming/discussion of ways to cultivate using clients’ artistic creativity in the clinical setting

  1. Brief discussion of clinical examples of creative work with clients:

–       Writing workshop for addicts

–       Trauma re-enactment visualization

–       Bringing repressed character qualities to life

–       Spell Map examples

–       Bubble Map examples

–       Circles of Problems and Resources examples

  1. V.             Summary, Conclusions, Q&A

 

9:30 am

TITLE:                        Edward Hopper’s Paintings and Severe Failed Mutuality

NEEDS:                      The quality of human relatedness may be ranged on a continuum with

intimacy (reciprocally-activating relationships) and autism (severe-failed mutuality) at polar extremes.   The paintings of Edward Hopper (1882-18670), a pioneer of 20th century Realism in America, portray couples where reciprocal gaze is absent and a sense of enigma is present. Without interviewing Hopper it would be impossible to know for certain whether or not he had Asperger’s disorder. It is hypothesized from a study of his paintings and the diaries of his wife, Josephine, that his relationship with her was characterized by severe failed mutuality which he depicted in his studies.

Understanding Hopper’s marital relationship and his pictures of couples will help the clinician recognize severe failed mutuality which has some of the characteristics of Asperger’s disorder.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify 3 of the symptom of severe failed mutuality.
  • Explain two reasons for not diagnosing Asperger’s syndrome in Edward Hopper.
  • Explain the concept of theory of mind and the meaning of empathy.

FORMAT:                  Didactic presentation enhanced with Power Point slides

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form.

SPEAKER:                 Michael Sperber M.D.

OUTLINE:

  1. The continuum of human relatedness with intimacy and severe failed mutuality as polar extremes, exemplified by Norman Rockwell’s “Thanksgiving” and Edward Hopper’s “Four Lane Road.”
  2. Comparison of van Gogh’s “Potato Eaters,” Hopper’s “Nighthawks” and Rembrandt’s “The Anatomy of Dr. Tulp.”
  3. Hopper’s paintings of couples.
  4. The marriage of Josephine and Edward Hopper
    1. Edward’s perspective through three caricatures.
    2. Josephine’s perspective and Arnold Newman’s portrait
  5. Summary and conclusions in the form  of a poem: “Jo & Ed”

 

 

 

 

10:45 am

 

TITLE:                        The Muse’s Call        

NEEDS:                      As clinicians, it is easy to become over-focused on the symptoms and pain

clients bring to health care professionals.  Working through symptoms is one aspect of the individuation process. Equally important is helping clients attune to their instincts, their pleasures, and the creative promptings of their muse. When clients heed their muse’s call, new flows of self-expression, new priories and commitments emerge in their lives. Clients become more identified with the creative unfolding of a deeper life plan, less identified with problematic feelings and behaviors.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this lecture the participant will be able to:

  • Describe how the archetype of the muse appears in every life.
  • Explain three primary ways western civilization has conceived of the muse—goddess in Classical Greece, woman of beauty and purity in Medieval Europe, powerful unconscious force in modern times.
  • Explain how paying attention to creative inspiration in all its forms can contribute to the well-being of clients in psychotherapy.
  • Recognize and explain the professional bias toward focusing on symptoms rather than on the muse’s creative promptings.

SPEAKER:                 Kathryn Ridall, Ph.D., MFT

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation.

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. The place of the muse in a psychology of individuation
  2. The archetype of the muse
    1. The muse as goddess in Classical Greece
    2. The human muse as in Medieval culture
    3. The modern muse in depth psychology— an aspect of Jung’s Self, Hillman’s daimon
    4. Benefits of emphasis on creative inspiration in psychotherapy
      1. Neurological and psychobiological benefits
      2. Restructuring life toward creative goals
      3. Clinical intervention choices—focus on symptom/complex or on emerging creative promptings
        1. Heightened awareness of default focusing on symptoms
        2. Watching for and modeling respect for authentic promptings from the client’s muse

11:45

 

TITLE:                        The Possessor and the Possessed: A Psychological Study of Mania & Mozart

NEEDS:                                  Mozart was a musical genius. Often described as having extraordinary creativity and exceptional abilities, yet he never attended any formal school. Reviewing Mozart’s medical history and behavioral symptoms will help the clinician and mental health professional understand how neuropsychiatric disorders may contribute to extraordinary talent.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List five major works of Mozart
  • List three medical illnesses that may have contributed to Mozart’s premature death
  • List three psychiatric disorders that might explain Mozart’s behavioral symptoms
  • Compare and contrast the characteristics of pathologic mania and potentially enabling hypomania.

SPEAKERS:               Roy Rogosin, MA & Shahna Rogosin, M.D.

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint Presentation

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. Mozart’s Background
    -Family
    -Review of Famous Works
    -Travel
  2.  Mozart’s Health
    -Typhoid Fever
    -Smallpox
    -Rheumatic fever
    -Syphilis?
  3. III.   Mozart’s Behavioral Symptoms
    -Mood Swings
    -Review of hypomania, mania, and bipolar disorder
    -Other Behavioral Symptoms:
    Anxiety, Tourette Syndrome, Pervasive                                         Developmental Disorder, ADHD?
  4.  Mozart’s Final Years and Days
    -Deterioration
    -Headaches
    -Fevers
    -Mozart’s demise
  5.  Theories of Mozart’s demise
    -Acute systemic process vs. progression of chronic illness

 

2:00– 5:00 pm        Optional Workshop – Pre-registration required

TITLE:                        Cultivating Creativity

ABSTRACT:                           Many psychotherapy clients reach points in therapy where they appear to be “stuck,” and clinicians often feel “stuck,” too. Other clients report feeling like their therapist is going “by the book” and that therapy feels stale and unhelpful. This “stuck-ness” and “staleness” is often thought of as “resistance” by the therapist, but sometimes it is due to failure to think outside an established pattern. It frequently leads to frustration and poor outcomes for client and clinician alike. This workshop combines presentation of creative tools and techniques that are helpful for “unsticking” clients, and uses/teaches imagination-based strategies for helping clinicians expand the creativity, flexibility, and effectiveness of their clinical practices.

FACILITATOR:       David Bookbinder, LMHC

FORMAT:                  Didactic Workshop with personal interaction.

 

 

4:00 – 6:00 pm

TITLE:                        Afternoon Discussion Group

NEEDS:                      These interactive discussion groups will give the participants an opportunity to share and discuss on a deeper and more detailed level the important psychosocial lessons taught in the morning lectures and so help them remove obstacles they might face in treating their patients. The Discussion Groups will be used to actively involve the participants in handling the concepts and principles presented, and to allow for greater elaboration and refinement of points made earlier

GROUP LEADER:     Members of the morning faculty

FORMAT:                  Interactive Group Discussions

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

 

 

Saturday, February 18

 

8:30am

TITLE:                        A Dry Place To Call Their Home: the Death of Kurt Cobain

NEEDS:                      Highly creative individuals grappling with self-destructive thoughts and behaviors pose serious challenges to clinicians when they enter psychotherapy. Besieged by traumatic loss—often dating back to childhood—they oscillate between commitment to a meaningful existence, and a simultaneous desire for death’s release. Kurt Cobain, the lead singer and songwriter of Nirvana, exemplifies the most disastrous sequel to despair that can no longer be borne. He committed suicide at the peak of his musical career, following a tumultuous road to stardom marred by drug addiction and familial loss. Analyzing the interconnectedness between trauma, creativity, and suicidality will be of value to clinicians working with highly creative and troubled patients.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize impediments to the treatment of such patients.
  • Understand the intimate relationship between creative potential and self-destruction.
  • Explain the role of traumatic loss, in all its manifestations, in planting the seeds of suicidal despair.
  • Understand the process by which life events are transposed onto creative productions.

SPEAKER:                 Mike Alvarez, MA

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced with PowerPoint slides

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. Introduction
  2. A Shattered Childhood
    1. Emergence of creative potential
    2. The impact of familial loss
  3. Adolescence
    1. Life as a vagabond
    2. Songwriting as a way of being
  4. Rise to Fame
    1. A life transposed onto music
    2. A career ravaged by drugs
  5. Death by Suicide
    1. A new nuclear family
    2. The fear of further loss
  6. Implications for Treatment
  7. Summary and Conclusions

 

9:30 am

 

TITLE:                        Love, Work and Dreams in the Establishment of Integrity

NEEDS:                      The issue of integrity is intrinsic to the psychological experience.  It plays

a significant role in one’s life as does one’s upbringing, one’s DSM diagnosis, one’s chemical makeup.  No matter what school of thought; from Freudian to Jungian to family systems, mindfulness to CBT, it is a concept and word rarely focused upon as the essential psychological basis for organizing one’s existence.

 

When examined, integrity can be seen as the confluence of three aspects: subjective integrity, contextual integrity and structural integrity. Having a clear understanding of these aspects can provide a guideline for clients to measure their psychological growth and stability.  For the clinician these three aspects of integrity can be used as an analytical tool and method for intervention.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the three aspects of integrity
  • Explain its applicability as seen through the use of the case presentation.
  • Expand one’s empathy for the patient by seeing his/her unique relationship to the three aspects of integrity.

SPEAKER:                 Robert Hyman, MFT

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. Introducing the concept of integrity and the confluence of its three aspects
  2. Establishing the current scene for the case study of Daniel.
  3. Daniel’s psycho/social history
  4. A comparison of the issue of integrity as it unfolded for Philippe and Daniel.

 

10:45 am

 

TITLE:                        Glory Days – Springsteen’s Impact on Popular Culture

NEEDS:                      Bruce Springsteen has produced a considerable body of original work that

has impacted the direction of popular music and American Culture.  His

influence extends from the stage into the classroom, and his works have

turned up in the syllabi of courses across the United States and around the

world.  Bruce Springsteen has become a bona fide subject of serious

scholarly study.  His work is complex, deep, and tied to so many compelling issues about American identity, race, class, work, gender, love, soul music, folk music, rock ‘n roll, narrative film, militarism, masculinity, and more.  His works offer us an opportunity to more deeply understand our culture, our fellow man, and ourselves.  Using Springsteen’s observational perspective, we can more effectively see ourselves in process; culturally, emotionally, developmentally and in the context of community.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to understand:

  • List three contemporaries, two who precedes and one who follows Bruce Springsteen’s place as a cultural spokesperson for our generation.
  • Describe the connections between music, poetry, cultural identification, and our own experience participating in these forms of expression.
  • List developmental stages in adulthood universally experienced in our culture.
  • Describe the components of the Homeric journey of leaving home, failure and coming home as first described in the Odyssey and re-iterated in Springsteen’s album “Magic”.

SPEAKER:                 Richard Grosse, LCSW

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by audio presentations of Springsteen’s work

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. I.               Introduction to Bruce Springsteen, who, what and where
  2. II.             Overview of his musical work to date
  3. III.           Overview of his community awareness, actions and impact
    1. Vietnam Vets
    2. Food banks
    3. Political Action
  4. Psychotherapy and Springsteen, metaphors for change
  5. The journey home, from Homer to Springsteen
    1. Overview of the adult developmental journey
    2. Homer’s Odyssey
    3. Springsteen’s Magic
    4. Summary and Conclusions

 

11:45 am

 

TITLE:                        Crooked Beauty and the Intertwined Threads of Madness, Creativity and Wellness

NEEDS:                      We live in a culture where those who do not write are written upon, particularly in regard to the interpretation and management of experiences commonly labeled as “psychiatric conditions.” The cultural narrative for mental distress privileges a ‘disease model’ of bio-chemical damage, pathology and medication. On other the hand, Carl Jung’s statement, “If you get rid of the pain before you have answered its questions, you get rid of the self along with it,” suggests that there is information for us in the dark places of human experience, depending on the integrity with which we navigate the space between brilliance and madness. This ‘dangerous gift model’ embraces the opportunity for obstacles to create new ways of seeing. If we can change mainstream media’s metaphors that shape our minds, we can change the reality around us. Counter to traditional mental health documentaries, Crooked Beauty creates a safe place for what is termed ‘illness’ or ‘madness’ to be addressed in terms of art and vision, without romanticizing or pathologizing, thus redeeming our everyday experiences and allowing us to claim entire lost parts of ourselves as creative, spiritual, even vocational assets.  Here we will examine our own capacity for change.   

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Distinguish between mental health struggles interpreted as biological brain disorders and understanding them as a reaction to social injustice, trauma, and oppression.
  • Challenge culturally mediated standards of normalcy by changing the way we think and speak about mental health and living authentically.
  • Reshape mental health stigmas into a new healing culture and political model for living with madness as a tool of creativity, insight, and integration.

SPEAKER:                 Ken Rosenthal, Filmmaker & Barry Panter, M.D.

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture and Film Showing

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

ABSTRACT:               The presentation will focus on the role of art in nurturing wellness through our relationship to the natural world, drawing new maps for ‘madness’ as a tool of insight, creativity and hope. The intertwined threads of madness, creativity and wellness will be explored as a means toward harnessing and transforming our personal sensitivities for the collective good. Part Q & A and part conscious dialogue, the post-film discussion will inspire personal transformation, critical reflection, and call the participants to action.

FILM NARRATIVE:

                                    Crooked Beauty is a 30-minute poetic documentary that chronicles artist-activist Jacks McNamara’s transformative journey from childhood abuse to psych ward patient to pioneering mental health advocate. It is an intimate portrait of her intense personal quest to live with courage and dignity, and a powerful critique of standard psychiatric treatments. Destined to overturn the stigmas usually associated with mental illness and develop authentic healing models for individuals diagnosed as ‘bipolar’, she co-founds The Icarus Project, an international support network and grassroots media project. Poignant testimonials connect the fissures and fault lines of human nature to the unstable topography and mercurial weather patterns of the San Francisco Bay Area. www.crookedbeauty.com

 

2:00 – 5:00              OPTIONAL WORKSHOP – Pre-registration required

TITLE:                        Healing the Self Through Self Portraits      

NEEDS:                      The goal of this optional workshop is to help find your inner artist/healer, with an exciting and eye-opening step-by-step approach to drawing portraits.  Overcome the “I can’t draw” syndrome. No previous art experience is necessary. Through a combination of drawing skills, visualization, and guided imagery, we reach deep parts of ourselves previously unavailable. Together we create striking and meaningful works of art.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation participants should have a:

        • Find your inner artist
        • Draw a self portrait from within
        • Develop and discover the artist that you never knew existed
        • Recognize the barriers that block success
        • Understand art as being helpful and useful in everyday life

SPEAKER:                 Amy Stein, MFA

FORMAT:                  3-Hour Experiential Workshop – Didactic and Personal Interaction

 

 

4:00 – 6:00 pm

TITLE:                        Afternoon Discussion Group

NEEDS:                      These interactive discussion groups will give the participants an opportunity to share and discuss on a deeper and more detailed level the important psychosocial lessons taught in the morning lectures and so help them remove obstacles they might face in treating their patients. The Discussion Groups will be used to actively involve the participants in handling the concepts and principles presented, and to allow for greater elaboration and refinement of points made earlier

GROUP LEADER:     Members of the morning faculty

FORMAT:                  Interactive Group Discussions

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

 

 

 

Sunday, February 19

 

8:30 am

TITLE:                                    Obata’s Art: The Sierra to Internment – Nature, Creativity and Healing

NEEDS:                      In devastating and oppressive circumstances, many individuals find it

difficult to find the internal and external means to cope.  Such were the circumstances for Japanese Americans during WWII’s internment.  Through explorations of Obata’s motivations, his art, and the value of teaching, the participants will learn how the internment experience was shifted therapeutically through Obata’s art and vision.  These therapeutic shifts in internment can be applied to clinical practice.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the response to oppression
  • Explain the benefits of art and nature in times of oppression
  • Explain the benefit of teaching and learning during stressful events
  • Apply philosophical and spiritual principles from internment to clinical practice

SPEAKER:                 David Lo, M.D.

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. Biography of Chiura Obata pre-internment, events leading to internment
  2. Explore the therapeutic benefits of art and nature, as seen through the art of internment.  Explore the therapeutic benefits of teaching.
  3. Application of the ideas, emotions, and forces specific to the internment to clinical practice.

9:30 am

TITLE:                        Edith Piaf, A study of Adversity and Resilience

                                    The Triumph of Creativity over Adversity

NEEDS:                      Many patients in clinical practice, are overwhelmed by the

adversities encountered in their lives. They often feel that all avenues out of despair, depression and destructive impulses, are closed.

The clinician needs to be aware of how to open the pathways from these self- destructive ideas and feelings to help his or her clients rise above the adversities of life and achieve a life of constructive work and hopefully some degree of happiness.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • List 4 of the ego mechanisms that can be utilized to combat the despair and depression that often accompany adversity.
  • Describe in layman’s terms these mechanisms so that the patient can understand and emulate them.
  • Explain the phenomenal power of creativity in combating depression and despair.
  • Be familiar with the life and work of Edith Piaf and explain why she is an outstanding example of Resilience.

SPEAKER:                   Jacqueline Panter, MA, MS

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by PowerPoint presentation

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

  1. Definition and examples of life adversities
  2.             Responses to life adversities
  3.             Negative
  • Despair
  • Depression
  • Drugs and alcohol
  • Suicide
  1.             Positive responses
  • Determination
  • Perseverance
  • Physical and Emotional Effort
  1.             The Uses of Creativity in the Above
  2.             Edith Piaf as an Example of Resilience and Survival
  3. Brief Biography
  • Early Life
  • Parents
  • Childhood
  • Circus
  • Brothel
  1. Discovery of Talent
  2.             Effort to Utilize her talent
  3.             Early Struggles
  4.             Enablers she encountered
  • LaPlee
  1. Life Successes
  2. The struggle within between Life Affirmation and Self           Destruction
  3. Ego Mechanisms
  4. Utilization in Clinical Practice
  5. Summary and Conclusions

 

10:45 am

 

TITLE:                        Brooke Astor, Annette de la Renta and Elder Abuse

NEEDS:                      The incidence of Elder Abuse is increasing multifold because of the aging of

the population. In 1996, there was a steady increase in the reporting of domestic elder and vulnerable adult abuse nationwide, from 117,000 reports In 1986 to 293,000 reports In 1996. This figure represents an increase of 150.4% since 1986 according to the national center on elder abuse web site. In 1998, the National Elder Abuse Incidence Study (NEAIS) suggested that only “the tip of the iceberg” of elder abuse is being identified.

Two national studies of cases reported to Adult Protective Services (APS) In 2000 and 2004 there was a 19.7% Increase In the abuse reports In all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the three Territories (Teaster, 2006).

Americans are living longer now, and with advances In medical research, nutrition and health care we are going to live even longer. In 2000, 35 million people were older than age 60 In the United States. This is 12% increase since 1990. Nearly 1 In 8 people (12.4% of the population) is at least 65 years old. By 2030, the numbers of older Americans will more than double to 70 million. Those 85 and older will increase from 4.2 million in 2000 to 8.9 million in 2030. Seniors are more likely to live with a disability, which has been shown to be a risk factor for some elder abuse.

There is a need to educate, not only physicians, psychologists, but even lay people to recognize these facts.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of the presentation, participants will be able to:

  • list three signs of elder abuse.
  • discuss and describe the increasing presence of this crime.
  • list three reasons for the increase
  • list 4 measures that can and should be taken by mental health professionals to recognize and stop elder abuse.

SPEAKER:                 Salila Sharma, M.D., FACP

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture enhanced by Power Point Presentation.

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form.

OUTLINE:

  1. Definition
  2. Description
  3. Famous examples
    1. Brook Astor
    2. Mickey Rooney
  4. Identification of elder abuse
    1. Signs and symptoms
  5. Agencies
    1. Adult Protective Services,
    2. Ombudsman In nursing home cases,
    3. Law Enforcement
    4. Prosecutor’s office
  6. References for reporting
  7. Legislation
  8. Summary and Conclusions

 

 

11:45 am

 

TITLE:                        Navigating the World of Social Media and the Helping Professions

NEEDS:                      The majority of clients young and old are turning to the Internet for just about everything – from making friends and finding lovers to gathering information about disease, the latest fad, and how to treat anxiety and depression. While the clinician may decide not to use Social Media platforms for their practices or personal lives, their clients are pushing Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube into powerful information and relationship structures. With the world at their fingertips, many patients, including helping professionals, are discovering the challenges and pitfalls of Social Media use in an age where privacy can no longer be guaranteed, and extroversion and exhibitionism shake hands with ADHD, narcissism, stalking, and voyeurism. Web celebrities like Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs, and important world figures like Barack Obama and His Holiness the Dalai Lama can become a part of the lives of the average person. Understanding what your clients are doing with Social Media, and what Social Media is doing to you and your clients will help you and your clients avoid these pitfalls and overcome these challenges.

OBJECTIVES:            At the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Explain what Social Media is, and how clients use or abuse it.
  • Name the challenges of Social Media use for both client and helping professional.
  • Recognize the challenges and pitfalls of Social Media use.
  • Recognize excessive and harmful misuse of Social Media on a personal or professional level.
  • Be able to interview clients on their use of Social Media, and identify more satisfying paths for its use.
  • Recall and describe real examples (through Web celebrities) of helpful and harmful Social Media use.
  • Predict Social Media trends that will affect the way clients and helping professionals will access medicine and the affect this will have on the way we practice medicine.

SPEAKER:                 Bernice Imei Hsu, RN, LMHC

FORMAT:                  Didactic lecture with PPP, screenshots, digital images, and video.

EVALUATION:          Standard Evaluation Form

OUTLINE:

I.          Definitions of Social Media (plus infographs of ways to describe it)

A. History of New Media

B. Current state of Social Media

1. Existence based on web presence

2. Relevance based on  Social Media content

C. Top three most powerful SoMe examples to date.

II.        Client Use

III.       Professional Use

IV.       Challenges and Pitfalls

A. Mark Zuckerburg/Steve Jobs (web celebrities)

B. Contender syndrome

V.        Tools for interviewing

VI.       Future use of Social Media in medicine

A. Information

B.  Increased access

C. Collaborative medicine

D. Restrictions

E. Mobile medicine on-the-go

VII.      Summary and Conclusion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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